How to obtain an F4 visa (Gyopo) PDF Print E-mail
Jul 30, 2012 at 07:35 PM

F4 Visa Qualification

You must be a Overseas Korean with foreign nationality (Gyopo) who had a Korean citizenship before obtaining a foreign nationality or an immediate family member of a Korean-foreigner who obtained foreign nationality is eligible for obtaining this visa.

 

The subject of Grant of Overseas Korean (Gyopo) status (F-4)

Overseas Korean with foreign nationality by Clause 3 of the Presidential Decree for Overseas Koreans Law

A person who had had Korean nationality and acquired foreign nationality.

A person whose either of parents or either of grandparents with Korean nationality acquired foreign nationality

 

 

Benefits

The visa gives a person nearly the same rights as a Korean citizen

Legally work anywhere in Korea

When you move from one school to another, there is no need of release papers

You can legally tutor students, which can be very lucrative in Korea.

The visa is renewable every two years, and you don’t have to change your visa if you change jobs.

Ways to obtain an F-4 visa

A. In your home country

From overseas you can contact nearest Korean embassy or consulate and follow the procedures for getting the visa as guided. Calling first is suggested. Check if there are any recent changes or updates to the F-4 visa process. Find your closest Korean Embassy & Consulate.

 

Renounce Korean Citizenship (if applicable)

You should make sure that you/your parent(s) have renounced citizenship from Korea. If not, you must first fill out the Korean nationality renunciation report with the Korean Ministry of Justice or the Korean Consulate before the visa application. You/your parent(s) should visit the nearest Korean consulate in order to renounce your/their Korean citizenship. From there, the immigration system would be updated accordingly but unfortunately, it might take up to three months to process. It may be possible for the consulate to provide you with a paper that indicates that you/your parent(s) have taken the necessary steps to renounce Korean citizenship. That way, you should be able to continue obtaining your F-4 visa after arrival in Korea.

 

Family Tree Registry

Make sure that it indicates you are no longer a citizen of South Korea. If your name is not listed on the registry, you need to register your name first and renounced. If  the name on your family registry is different from your legal name, you must also bring forms documenting you/your parent’(s) legal name change(s).

 

Birth Certificate

If you are a Canadian citizen, the long-form birth certificate is required (which contains both of your parents’ names, where they were born in Korea, etc.)

 

B. In Korea

There is a department in the Korean Immigration Service for F-4 visa. You can arrive in Korea on a regular tourist visa and then apply for your F4 visa. Ensure that you value the tourist visa time limit. Find your closest Korean Immigration Office.

 

Please compare which way is faster in consideration of your school starting date and choose to apply in your home country or in Korea on tourist visa.

 

 

Required Documents

A. If you were born in Korea

Documents that prove you were once a Korean citizen (for example, a Korean family tree registry called 'Ho Juk Deung Bon' with certified removal, or a Korean birth certificate)

Documents which proves the reason, date, month and year of acquiring a foreign nationality of oneself and one's immediate descendants. (ex. copy of citizenship certificate)

Download: Application form

Download: Domestic Residence Report of Foreign National Korean

Passport

At least two passport-sized photos

Processing Fee

Other documents which are deemed to be necessary by the Ministry of Justice

 

To get Ho Juk Deung Bon, you need below information and is available at any “gu" office in South Korea.

Mother/Father’s full name

Mother/Father’s old Korean ID #

Mother/Father’s old Korean address

 

B. If your parent(s) or grandparent(s) were born in Korea

Documents showing that your parent(s) or grandparent(s) held Korean citizenship (for example, a Korean family tree registry called 'Ho Juk Deung Bon' with certified removal)

Documents showing the date and reason for acquiring foreign citizenship (A birth certificate or other official document that shows you are related to your parent(s) or grandparent(s))

Documents which proves the reason, date, month and year of acquiring a foreign nationality of oneself and one's immediate descendants. (ex. copy of citizenship certificate)

Download: Application form

Download: Domestic Residence Report of Foreign National Korean

Passport

At least two passport-sized photos

Processing Fee

Other documents which are deemed to be necessary by the Ministry of Justice

 

C. If you are a Korean adoptee

Original adoption certificate

Copy of Korean family registry

Naturalization papers (if US citizen)

Download: Application form

Download: Domestic Residence Report of Foreign National Korean

A birth certificate, citizen’s certificate or other documents (depending on country of origin)

Passport

At least two passport-sized photos

Processing Fee

Other documents which are deemed to be necessary by the Ministry of Justice

 

If you were adopted, contact G.O.A.L, a non-profit organization that aids Korean adoptees. They will be able to tell you the agency through which you were adopted,and help you obtain copies of your adoption certificate and family registry. This is especially helpful if you don’t have your original adoption certificate. G.O.A.L. also has offices in Korea and can help you obtain your visa once in Korea.

 

Last Updated ( Jul 30, 2012 at 07:46 PM )